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Our nation's history would not be complete without the story of Santa Fe​

Our nation's history would not be complete without the story of Santa Fe​

Santa Fe 101 Guide | Eat

Santa Fe has an unusually high number of really good and diversified restaurants for a such a small town. First and foremost, are the numerous restaurants that serve northern New Mexican cuisine, which is a blend of Native American, Spanish and Mexican food. The foundation of our local cuisine is the red and green chile. In fact, the red chile ristra that you see hanging in front of buildings and homes has become a ubiquitous Santa Fe tradition. New Mexico boasts as being the chile capital of the world and it’s a multi-million-dollar industry. Chile was introduced to the state during the 16th century by the Mexican Indian servants who accompanied the Spanish colonists to the region. The Pueblo Indians quickly adopted chile into their diets, as well as the Anglo settlers in the 19th century. Locally grown chile, primarily from the southern part of the state, is harvested in the autumn. The green chile peppers are roasted and then frozen for use in popular dishes throughout the year. The rest of crop is allowed to ripen and then dried for red chile dishes. The three most popular New Mexican restaurants frequented by our visitors are The Shed, Tomasitas and La Choza. Please note that all three of these establishments are closed on Sunday. Two New Mexican restaurants open on Sunday in proximity to the Santa Fe plaza are Atricos and Maria’s Mexican Kitchen. There are numerous restaurants around town serving New Mexican food that are all very good.

Table of Contents

Overview

Many of us old-time locals often venture north to eat New Mexican food that’s reminiscent of our childhood, since some of these dishes are no longer served in Santa Fe restaurants. A good example of authentic New Mexican cuisine can be found in Las Comidas de los Abuelos,

(The Foods of Our Grandparents), which I published in 2003. The cookbook features 490 authentic New Mexican recipes by local contributors.

Many of us old-time locals often venture north to eat New Mexican food that’s reminiscent of our childhood, since some of these dishes are no longer served in Santa Fe restaurants. A good example of authentic New Mexican cuisine can be found in Las Comidas de los Abuelos,

(The Foods of Our Grandparents), which I published in 2003. The cookbook features 490 authentic New Mexican recipes by local contributors.

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market and La Montañita Co-op Food Market contribute to the vitality of the city’s fabled food reputation. All of the cultural festivals during the summer’s high season feature food booths and food trucks serving an array of food that caters to just about everyone.

In September Santa Fe hosts the Wine & Chile festival that showcases, not only our chile, but New Mexico’s burgeoning wine industry, as well. Food tours and food trucks are plentiful around Santa Fe throughout the year.

There are approximately five hundred restaurants in Santa Fe. The list below is broken down by location, type of cuisine and excludes fast food and chain restaurants.

Santa Fe Plaza Area

De Vargas Center

New Solana Shopping Center

Railyard, Guadalupe & Baca District

Canyon Road

South Capitol

Midtown

Meow Wolf District

Southside

Airport Road

Santa Fe Periphery

Española

Hernandez

Chocolate

Chocolate has a storied history in New Mexico that began with our neighbors to the south in Mexico. Listed below are the places to find chocolate catering to all palates. My favorite continues to be Señor Murphy, which was established in 1971. In addition to their piñon chocolates, they make an array of chile treats including red and green chile brittle.